KFC’s dancing chicken most complained about ad of 2017

Chickens? Dancing? A Kentucky-Fried-themed rap? Throw them all together and you’ve got yourself the most complained about ad of 2017.

Of the 30,000 complaints made to the UK’s advertising watchdog, the Advertising Standards Authority, last year, 755 of those were about KFC’s ‘The Whole Chicken’, seeing it top the chart for the second time after its hugely unpopular Zinger Crunch Salad ad received a whopping 1,671 complaints back in 2005 (and where it remained for another nine years).

However, despite concerns that it was disrespectful to chickens and distressing for vegetarians, vegans and children, the ASA ruled it was unlikely the ad would cause distress or serious widespread offence and KFC’s chicken was allowed to waltz away into the sunset (or wherever it was on its way to).

It turns out people aren’t big fans of men dancing in denim hot pants and heels either, with Moneysupermarket.com’s ‘strutters and builders’ campaign featuring in the ASA’s top 10 for a third year running.

Again, despite the 455 complaints made, the ASA didn’t think the ad was overtly sexual or possibly homophobic – like many of the complainants did – and let the ‘#epicsquad’ continue to dance their way to cheaper car insurance.

Dove’s controversial breastfeeding ads, which were criticised for using language such as ‘put them away’, received 391 complaints and were pulled by parent company Unilever before the ASA could launch an investigation.

McDonald’s also dodged interrogation and removed its TV ad featuring a boy and his mum talking about his dead father over a Filet-O-Fish, which generated 256 complaints.

Read more at Marketing Week: https://www.marketingweek.com/2018/02/01/kfcs-dancing-chicken-complained-ad-2017/

Bud Light Tries to Resurrect Its Punchline Personality in Ad Evoking ‘Game of Thrones’

Bud Light is channeling “Game of Thrones” in a new ad that tries to bring back the frivolous, funny marketing that propelled the brand in its heyday. The spot by Wieden & Kennedy marks the first of several upcoming humorous ads for the nation’s largest brew, which in recent years has struggled to find the right tone to appeal to today’s drinkers.

Screen Shot 2017-08-28 at 3.07.28 PM.png

The new ad is called “Banquet” and debuted ahead of this weekend’s “Game of Thrones” season finale. It shows people presenting a king and queen with increasing quantities of Bud Light. After one man makes the mistake of attempting to please the royals with a “spiced honey mead wine,” he is banished to the “pit of misery.” Throughout the ad, the made-up phrase “Dilly, Dilly” acts as a medieval version of “cheers.”

Read more at Creativity-Online: http://creativity-online.com/work/bud-light-banquet/52543

Chili’s Picks O’Keefe Reinhard & Paul for Campaign as It Seeks a Rebound

Chili’s Grill & Bar has hired O’Keefe Reinhard & Paul for a major marketing project as the chain tries to reverse recent trends, Ad Age has learned.

download

Chili’s is no longer working on creative projects with Hill Holliday, which was its agency of record for almost a decade, though Hill Holliday appears to still be handling some media work for the brand.

Read more at Ad Age: http://adage.com/article/agency-news/chili-s-picks-o-keefe-reinhard-paul-project/309834/

Why have grocery stores changed the channel on TV advertisements?

Broadcast ads are few and far between, with analysts saying there are far better ways to reach today’s consumers.

fa0a0875f97857aaa649ae4d3bba2b73.jpg

TV viewers in the San Antonio, TX area have almost certainly seen H-E-B commercials over the years that feature some of the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs —including All-Stars like Manu Ginobili, Tim Duncan and Pau Gasol—talking about the Texas-based grocer’s products, preparing foods and praising produce.

Read more at FoodDive.com: http://www.fooddive.com/news/grocery–why-have-grocery-stores-changed-the-channel-on-tv-advertisements/444251/

 

Nutella Creates Seven Million Jars Covered in One-of-a-Kind Patterns

Nutella_NutellaUnica17

Nutella has done customization before, with a personalized name labels project in 2014 that proved poular in stores like London’s Selfridges.
But now it has gone even further — in Italy earlier this year, the Ferrero-owned hazelnut spread created seven million limited-edition jars, each with a completely unique label.

Continue reading