Social Media And Food: The Sharing Gap

New figures reveal that, each day globally, 3.5 million photos of food are posted, liked and shared around the world1. That’s an online food conversation totalling 1.2 billion posts in the space of a year on a global scale. But we are sharing food so that it can be admired, not eaten. Shared, but not shared.

The World Food Programme (WFP) tells us that the latest figures show that 815 million people2 – or one in nine of the global population – still go to bed hungry. If one in nine of our food photos this week globally was instead a donation of a meal – just 25 cents – 2 million more people would be fed this week alone.

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“As a society, we have never been more passionate about food. There are 1.2 billion social media posts using the hashtag #food each year. Yet 815 million people go hungry. This has to change,” said Cathryn Sleight, EVP Knorr. “As one of the world’s largest food brands, we can’t ignore this imbalance and we feel a responsibility to try and change these statistics for the better. The causes of global hunger are complex, but on World Food Day we invite people to join us in raising awareness of the problem and taking action. Whether it’s sharing our post or actually making a donation themselves through the WFP’s ShareTheMeal app, everyone can make a difference.”

“In 2016, WFP empowered over 14 million people with the power to choose and prepare the right food to share with their families,” said Prerana Issar, Director of Private Sector Partnerships for the World Food Programme. “This year on World Food Day, Knorr’s call to reach out and share a meal through social media is an inspiring example of how a simple action can make a big difference in someone’s life.”

The ShareTheMeal app is available to download here https://app.adjust.com/u0ts56, on iOS AND Android platforms.

This World Food Day, Knorr is giving food lovers the opportunity to turn their food posts into a real meal for someone in need.  On October 16th, each time Knorr’s #ShareTheMeal post is shared or retweeted on Facebook and Twitter, Knorr will donate the equivalent of one meal via the World Food Programme (WFP), up to a total of 1.5 million meals. Knorr is also encouraging people to download WFP’s ShareTheMeal app which enables them to take a food photo and donate as little as 47 cents, enough to feed a child for a day, with a simple tap on their smartphone.

The money donated by Knorr will give families in need – via WFP’s system of cash-based transfers – the means to choose and buy their own food with dignity and freedom. This year’s campaign builds upon the success of previous World Food Day activations, which have seen Knorr donate over 3 million nutritious school meals since 2014 through its partnership with the World Food Programme.

“As a society, we have never been more passionate about food. There are 1.2 billion social media posts using the hashtag #food each year. Yet 815 million people go hungry. This has to change,” said Cathryn Sleight, EVP Knorr. “As one of the world’s largest food brands, we can’t ignore this imbalance and we feel a responsibility to try and change these statistics for the better. The causes of global hunger are complex, but on World Food Day we invite people to join us in raising awareness of the problem and taking action. Whether it’s sharing our post or actually making a donation themselves through the WFP’s ShareTheMeal app, everyone can make a difference.”

“In 2016, WFP empowered over 14 million people with the power to choose and prepare the right food to share with their families,” said Prerana Issar, Director of Private Sector Partnerships for the World Food Programme. “This year on World Food Day, Knorr’s call to reach out and share a meal through social media is an inspiring example of how a simple action can make a big difference in someone’s life.”

The ShareTheMeal app is available to download here https://app.adjust.com/u0ts56, on iOS AND Android platforms.

Read more at PR News Wire: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/social-media-and-food-the-sharing-gap-300536424.html

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Burger King Dug Up a Bunch of Tweets From People Complaining About Wendy’s and Turned Them Into Ads

Talk about savage. To promote its new spicy chicken nuggets, Burger King is subtly taking aim at Wendy’s—known for its vocal, personality-driven account—on Twitter.

In March, Wendy’s announced that it was removing its popular spicy chicken nuggets from its menu and fans began venting on social media and even set up a Change.org petition asking Wendy’s to reconsider its decision.

Now, Burger King has launched its own version of the item and it’s throwing some shade at Wendy’s via social media. The burger chain evidently trolled through tweets from people complaining about not being able to get their hands on nuggets and is running promoted tweets against them so that months-old tweets populate in newsfeeds.

Take a look at a handful of the tweets Burger King paid to promote.

Read more at AdWeek: http://www.adweek.com/digital/burger-king-dug-up-a-bunch-of-tweets-from-people-complaining-about-wendys-and-turned-them-into-ads/

Twizzlers taps Facebook lens for ‘World Smile Day’

Twizzlers rolled out a branded Facebook lens that superimposes a virtual candy rope and brand logo over real videos of users in its latest campaign, “You can’t be serious with Twizzlers,” in honor of World Smile Day on Oct. 6, according to MediaPost. The campaign also includes seven TV spots, a long-form video, content created by six social media influencers and hashtag #Twizzlering to connect fans and serve as a hub for user-generated content.

The Hershey Company brand initially claimed the lens was the first brand partnership for the Facebook feature, which launched in March, but later retracted the claim, MediaPost reported. The brand is still an early adopter of the feature. Users can access the lens by clicking on the camera or Stories sections in the Facebook app.

The campaign originally launched in spring 2016 based on “poking serious people and catching their unserious reactions,” according to Mona Hasan, creative director at CP+B, the agency behind the campaign. “This filter is our way of loosening them up.”

Read more at Marketing Dive: http://www.marketingdive.com/news/twizzlers-taps-facebook-lens-for-world-smile-day/507006/

Carl’s Jr pesters Amazon on Twitter to acquire it

In a series of tweets at Amazon starting Monday morning, Carl’s Jr began urging the e-commerce giant to buy it out. Using the hashtag “#AmazonBuyUs,” the fast food chain pelted Amazon with tweets steadily throughout the day.

The chain, with some 3,000 U.S. locations (which includes sibling fast food brand Hardees), is in the doldrums, with flatlining same store sales, according to The Street. Parent CKE Restaurant Holdings Inc. was acquired four years ago by private equity firm Roark Capital Group.

Read more at Marketing Dive: http://www.marketingdive.com/news/carls-jr-pesters-amazon-on-twitter-to-acquire-it/506921/

Wingstop and Wendy’s Got Into a Rap Battle in the Most 2017 Brand Marketing Story Imaginable

The people on the social media team for quick-serve food chain Wingstop, whose account is handled by Barkley, were apparently feeling good about themselves Monday afternoon.

That is to say, they decided to let loose a little verse, repurposing the flow from Migos’ definitely-not-PG-13 “Bad and Boujee (feat. Lil Uzi Vert)” into a more family-friendly emoji-filled rhyme about eating hot wings and playing Xbox.Screen Shot 2017-10-05 at 8.36.52 AMBefore long, a fan—plus a little chuckling encouragement from Wingstop—drew Wendy’s into the mix, which offered a reference of its own, serving up the main hook of Kendrick Lamar’s “Humble” (like in this week’s L.A. campaign, the radio-friendly version).Screen Shot 2017-10-05 at 8.39.13 AMWingstop, not interested in sitting down, or being humble, parried.

It didn’t take things long to escalate from there, as the brands traded jabs in lyrical form, knocking each others’ food and spewing bravado.

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They ran out of steam as 5 p.m. approached and everyone decided it would probably be better just to go home—but tried to squeeze in the last word.