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Posts from the ‘David the Agency’ category

Velveeta is among the many brands that this week are pushing a Royal Wedding-themed product–and it’s made a funny royalty-themed ad to go with it.

The Kraft Heinz brand has renamed its Shells & Cheese product as “Crowns & Cheese” for the big day on May 19. The crown-shaped pasta is packaged alongside the original Shells & Cheese and a gold-plated spoon in a gold foil box, and Velveeta will be offering the boxes to the first people to enter on www.RoyallyTreatYourself.com, while supplies last.

To promote Crowns & Cheese, agency David Miami has fun with the idea of eating like a princess in an online spot. In the video, a Meghan Markle/Kate Middleton brunette lookalike (well, kinda) is given lessons on “how to act like a royal princess.” This apparently involves sitting demurely, wearing long skirts and stupid hats, no selfies, drinking very little and eating even less. “F*** this,” says our heroine eventually, before going on to tuck into a bowl of Crowns & Cheese. The tagline is “Who wants to be a princess, when you can eat like a queen?”

Jeff & Pete of Fish Face directed the spot.

from Creativity-Online: http://creativity-online.com/work/velveeta-crowns–cheese/54541

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On the heels of its brilliant anti-bullying spot last year, Burger King has found another cause it can get behind, and promote with a clever in-store stunt—net neutrality.

In December, you’ll recall, the FCC repealed net neutrality rules that regulated businesses that provide internet access to consumers—opening the door for broadband providers to potentially charge more for better internet speed or higher-quality service.

Net neutrality is a complicated topic to explain, though. Which is where Burger King came in with a meaty metaphor. It set up a social experiment at a BK location—with a hidden-camera setup not unlike that of the anti-bullying spot—and taught Whopper buyers a memorable lesson.

Below, see how real customers reacted to being charged more for the same quick-serve Whopper—or, for the regular price, having to wait longer for a Whopper as BK employees intentionally, and seemingly pointlessly, slow down their service.

David Miami, the agency behind so many clever BK campaigns in recent years, made the new spot. It’s very different than the “Bullying Jr.” PSA, but in some ways works similarly.

In place of the more emotional and poignant ending of that earlier spot, here we get a more plainly hostile vibe from the patrons—which fits the issue at hand better. If you were served a mashed-up burger, you’d be mostly confused; if you’re openly denied good service, you’d probably get annoyed pretty quickly.

There’s plenty of cursing in between the baffled looks; a few patrons even make a move to snatch their Whopper away from the BK employees. There’s a dose of “Whopper Freakout” in here, and you get the sense that the stunt could easily have turned violent—thankfully, it didn’t.

The pricing board that they showed customers is great, too—with MBPS, referring to megabytes per second in webspeak, changed to mean “making burgers per second.”

from AdWeek: http://www.adweek.com/creativity/burger-king-deviously-explains-net-neutrality-by-making-people-wait-longer-for-whoppers/

Burger King’s latest marketing stunt involves some public shaming from customers about themselves, all in the name of free food.

The flame-grilled burger chain wants people who have been fired to admit it on LinkedIn. It’s not offering them jobs, though some stand to get a bit of help finding them. The “Whopper Severance” plan offers a free Whopper to the first 2,500 people who publicly confess on LinkedIn that they were fired.

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With “Whopper Severance,” the first 100 people who participate can get a 30-minute session with online career resource The Muse. Burger King says the first 2,500 people who post “fire”-y messages between Aug. 29 and Sept. 1 will get a Whopper Severance letter and a Burger King gift card.

See more at Creativity-Online: http://creativity-online.com/work/burger-king-whopper-severance/52544

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One of the most delightful ad campaigns of 2017, for Heinz ketchup, wasn’t written by a real person. It came from Mad Men’s most famous creative director (via showrunner and lead writer Matthew Weiner), and lived only fictionally within the AMC show about 1960s advertising—until Anselmo Ramos and his agency, David Miami, came along.

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Burger King is being honored as Creative Marketer of the Year here in Cannes this year. It’s an honor that recognizes the brand’s entire history of stellar advertising, from its glory years at CP+B a decade ago, when it made legendary pieces like “Subservient Chicken” and “Whopper Freakout,” and more recent megahits like “Proud Whopper” and “McWhopper.”

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